catsbeaversandducks:

Meet Esther the Wonder Pig

"Esther came to us as a supposed "minipig". Little did our uneducated asses know we were in for a big surprise… literally!

Esther is a pig, that’s really all we know since she was misrepresented as a “micropig”. She was born in spring of 2012 to what we believe was a commercial farm litter. She was somehow removed, perhaps because she was a runt?, and somehow found her way to us. 

We hope this page will make you take a minute to re-evaluate some of your daily choices, such as bacon for example. We always seem to prefer the “I’d rather not think about it” approach, but if you took just a few minutes to learn how brutal life is for these loving, intelligent and compassionate animals I know it would change your mind and maybe even convince you to give a vegitarian/vegan lifestyle a chance.”

Photos/caption by Steve Jenkins | ©Esther the Wonder Pig

Via I Have Seen The Whole Of The Internet

Sometimes I would get invited to a party or to go out to dinner by one of them and I would decline. Part of me wanted to go, but those kind of outings always made me feel even more alienated than usual. Hearing them talk made me feel lonely and hateful at the same time. Lonely because I didn’t fit in, never did. When I was reminded, it hurt. And hateful because it reaffirmed what I already knew, that I was alone and on the outside.
― Henry Rollins, The Portable Henry Rollins (via thatkindofwoman)

awkwardsituationist:

when kai fagerström happened upon an old cottage in rural suomusjärvi, finland, abandoned decades ago, he began to document its new residents.

there were badger cubs born under the floorboards, who now used the fireplace as an entrance. there was a raccoon dog pup who would drop in every night at the same time. there was a pygmy owl who would try to catch the home’s voles. there were red squirrels who had built their dreys inside the house. and there was a fox pup, seen peeking out from a cat door, that had taken up in the dilapidated shed.

"there’s consolation in the idea that nature is reclaiming the places it has lent to people," he says, adding that when he enters the house “it’s like stepping back in time. the past lingers in the corners.” it’s not just the animals that interest him, but the people no longer there. “who were they? what was their daily life like?” he asks.

to get his shots of these human wary animals, fagerström typically envisions an image first and then plans it out. he’ll set his camera at the perfect angle, throw out peanuts as bait, and wait patiently for wildlife to wander into the picture frame. “sometimes you get lucky, but often it takes all night,” he says. “every so often a shot is pure happenstance.”

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